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Why do Rabbis love to answer questions with “Its not recommended”?

rabbi1I hate when I ask a rabbi something and instead of saying the dont know, or telling you they need to look it up they say its not recommended I hate this answer because it just leaves you hanging without any real knowledge, they say it all the time and it bugs the crap out of me. Questions like what do you think of showering on yom tov always elicit this response. Why do rabbis do this? Why cant they just say they dont know or they will tell you later?

{ 71 comments… add one }
  • SF2K1 April 20, 2009, 3:58 PM

    The worst thing isn’t their not knowing. The worst thing is their then instructing you based on the fact that they don’t know.

    “What bracha is this?”
    “Hmm it’s part Mezonot, part shehakol… Better to be safe: Eat some Mezonot, eat some Shehakol, then eat it or just Wash.” <– Not the answer anyone wants.

  • Sergeant J April 20, 2009, 4:10 PM

    “I don’t know” went out of fashion for rabbis ages ago.. Barring the ones who are asked by the cops to give the locations of the child molesters they are hiding…

  • Sarah April 20, 2009, 4:18 PM

    ask a diff rav then. or ask a askmoses rabbi.

  • offthederech April 20, 2009, 4:26 PM

    Knowledge is power…

  • fakewood April 20, 2009, 4:44 PM

    otd your a rabid antisemitic fool. go to your new rebbe dawkins.

  • Jelen April 20, 2009, 4:48 PM

    my rabbi tells me he’ll check and get back to me. he’s my favorite.

  • TRS April 20, 2009, 4:50 PM

    Ever heard of l’chatchilah and b’dieved?

  • offthederech April 20, 2009, 5:16 PM

    fakewood: wtf is wrong with you?

  • EWS April 20, 2009, 5:34 PM

    It makes sense for a specific hechsher. “it’s not recommended to eat” but when it goes beyond simple questions it just seems vague.

  • anom April 20, 2009, 7:54 PM

    take a look at this site http://chassidishtravel.blogspot.com/ should we travel more often Rabbi’s say its not recommended but is allowed

  • fakewood April 20, 2009, 7:59 PM

    otd

    you.

  • Phil April 20, 2009, 8:02 PM

    “Not recommended” or “better not to” is the ultimate cop out answer of the ingorant rabbi that won’t admit he doesn’t know.

    I’ve run into it before, my answer to the rabbis in those instances is “my 3 year old can tell me it’s better not to, that’s why I came to you”.

    Sarah, Askmoses rabbis won’t answer any complex halachic issues, they’ve told me to ask a rav on a number of occasions.

  • Priss April 20, 2009, 8:38 PM

    -Shower ye people- James Taylor approves of cleanliness, and so do I.http://www.musicsonglyrics.com/J/jamestaylorlyrics/jamestaylorshowerthepeoplelyrics.htm

  • offthederech April 20, 2009, 8:39 PM

    Fakewood: Go impersonate me again. Then tell me I’m your *problem*.

  • veebee April 20, 2009, 9:28 PM

    otd – he impersonated you and you caught him? Oh jesus failcakes. If you’re going to impersonate someone on the interwebs, L2proxy.

    ‘Not recommended’ is when the rabbi steps over his halachik position and wants to add extra chumras onto you.

  • smooth shemp April 20, 2009, 9:37 PM

    Why do Rabbis love to answer questions with Its not recommended? i’d tell you the answer but it’s not recommended…

  • Mark April 20, 2009, 10:52 PM

    A rabbi only uses that answer with me once. Because I never ask that kind of Rabbi another question after that. When I ask a question (very rarely), I want a clear answer, and I want the sources used to derive that answer so I can do further research if I am so inclined. A Rav is a teacher, not a cult leader that tells us what to do and what not to do. That’s one of my main objections to Charedism.

  • Michal bas Avraham April 20, 2009, 11:43 PM

    I think this means they don’t want to admit that it’s a chumrah rather than halacha, so they say it’s recommended or not recommended.

    I recently experienced one of these not so black and white answers from my rabbi. When I Emailed him about how am I supposed to hold during sefiras ha omer… first 33 or last 33 and music. The reply I got was that many don’t listen to any music, most will just listen to acapella and that he knows of rabbis who permit any recorded music.

    I see Veebee came to the same conclusion as I did…

    Shemp- LOL!

    Fakewood, I’m with OTD, your comment seemed to come out of nowhere, at least within this post, (I’m sure I’ll hear it for thinking that, though)

  • Michal bas Avraham April 21, 2009, 12:07 AM

    Veebee… I came to the same conclusion. They are trying to put on a chumrah and don’t want to admit it outright.

    My rabbi is usually not like this. I asked him what to do with music for Sefiras. He said that some don’t listen, most others listen only to acapella and he does know of rabbis that permit any recorded music… When you will be sitting on the subway for an hour and a half, you grow to depend on a CD so….

  • chosid April 21, 2009, 12:22 AM

    That’s the answer given by a Rav who knows that the answer is the one that you don’t want to hear and that he doesn’t want to give you. But he tries to find some room to make your life a little easier.

    Any fool can just asser everything. It takes real intelligence and compassion to find a way to permit something that is important. The example you used is not a bad one. The real answer is no you can’t shower on yontif. Ah but there are exceptions to this rule under different circumstances.

    Mark, the definition of a Rav is first and foremost to tell us what to do. You come to a rav for psak din. You can ask a chavrusa to learn but that is not a Rav’s primary responsibility. And the term “charedism” is about as specific as “Jewish.”

  • SF2K1 April 21, 2009, 1:05 AM

    Phil,

    Askmoses used to be infinitely more awesome before they replaced all Rabbis who could give you answers (even the ones who could barely speak English!) with Rebbetzins who just told you to ask a Rabbi for even the simplest of questions.

  • Mark April 21, 2009, 1:20 AM

    chosid – Mark, the definition of a Rav is first and foremost to tell us what to do. You come to a rav for psak din. You can ask a chavrusa to learn but that is not a Ravs primary responsibility. And the term charedism is about as specific as Jewish.

    Yes, I clearly understand that from your point of view a Rav is there to tell you what to do. From my point of view, Hashem gave me a brain, a pretty good one at that, and I believe that it is incumbent (and even a mitzvah) on me to use it to the best of my ability. Therefore, I don’t use a Rav to tell me what to do, but rather to explain to me what I should do, even when he is rendering a P’sak I want him to explain the sources to me. Finally, you are dead wrong, a Rav is a teacher.

    And Charedism is the Jewish form of cults.

  • Bsamim Smoker April 21, 2009, 1:47 AM

    The best one is whrn you ask a rabbi a question and they answer you with a question.Example:Rabbi are you allowed to go to a beach with a Michitzah?
    And You get a response:Why do you want to know?(i.e.don’t you know it’s bittul torah to go to a beach!)

  • Bsamim Smoker April 21, 2009, 1:57 AM

    Or the best one is “Dus is nisht da yishivisha mehalach”.And your thinkin”thanks for underestimating my intelligence, of course I knew that, I wanted to know if it was mutar or usser from a OBJECTIVE halacha point of view”.Sometimes I feel like telling the rabbi after I ask my question”Don’t say anything,go to that bookshelf overthere take out a Shulchan Orech and read me the answer VIRBATUM(if I need a word transalated I will tell you)”.

  • Bsamim Smoker April 21, 2009, 2:07 AM

    But of course most prized $60,0000-a-year rabbis will not do that because you’ve down downgraded them from a larger-than-life celeberty to a pencil pushing technician, this position is extermely compromising to the image they portray to the ignorant masses. only a selet few individuals(i.e.the old humble man in the back of the shul)who shuns honor will tell you the truth.

  • Michal bas Avraham April 21, 2009, 2:26 AM

    Chosid,
    You can’t use hot water on yontiff. Since it’s normally not reasonable to think that you are showering with ice cold water, functionally you can’t shower on yontiff… However, last Shavuos, many showered and the idea was to use ice cold water-if you all remember.

    Bsamin,
    The rabbi doesn’t want to tell you because he would never go to a beach, he’s scared. So true about few will dare to speak truth. Speak truth and you will be hated….

  • Michal bas Avraham April 21, 2009, 2:30 AM

    Ok, that went up but my two attempts to tell about my rabbi doing this to me disappeared into I guess spam….

  • ghottistyx April 21, 2009, 4:13 AM

    B’samim, pardon my dismal Yiddish, but I’m assuming that means “that’s not the Yeshiva way.” There’s another one that grinds my gears: being told that it’s not assur, but we just don’t do it. My sister went through a lot of that when she tried making her wedding such that women would be more involved in the process. She went through many Ortho Rabbis asking them bottom line “is this against halakha, and I’m not interested in what’s commonly practiced, just tell me bottom line is it assur or not?” Several even slammed the door in her face. Plenty of Rabbis do not feel comfortable being approaced with potential iconoclasm. The Mesader Kiddushin himself almost pulled out last minute because of a couple of items she got approved (one of which, I believe, was having a female ‘meturgeman’). She was given an ultimatum of either pulling them out of the program or finding a new Mesader Kiddushin.

  • Mark April 21, 2009, 8:12 AM

    Michal – You cant use hot water on yontiff.

    This is interesting to me. So, you can use hot water to cook on yomtov (if heated in the proper way, etc), but you cannot use hot water to bathe? What is the source of that ruling?

  • Phil April 21, 2009, 8:36 AM

    Mark / Michal,

    The law is straightforward: You can’t do anything on Yom Tov that you wouldn’t do on Shabbos except for 2 categories, namely carrying and using fire, both only in instances where they are demmed “needed” or “necessary”.

    For example, you can carry your house key on Yom Tov where there is no eruv, but not a set of car keys.

    When it comes to fire / hot water, we are again stuck with outdated rulings that became law. Consider the following:

    A few hundred years ago, smoking was considered necessary, even beneficial. Hence, the ruling that permits smoking on Yom Tov.

    Conversly, bathing was something only done once a week at most, thereby ruled not necessary, thereby forbidden.

    Today, we would need a consensus of 100 major rabbis to refute and rewrite these laws. As we can’t even get a few rabbis to agree on any given issue, looks like were stuck yet again.

  • MO and proud of it April 21, 2009, 8:54 AM

    I believe that rabbis give this answer when what you are asking is NOT assur, it’s just “not done”. Because usually if you push a rabbi in this situation for his sources, there aren’t any or they don’t hold water. If it’s assur it’s easy to say that and give you chapter and verse as to why. The other circumstance is when as someone said they don’t trust a particular hechsher or something like that but can’t say so outright because of fear of reprisal. (What’s even worse in this situation is that they’ll claim that they don’t know anything about it, and you KNOW that’s not true — but then you realize that’s code for “I don’t trust it but I’ll never go on record as saying so.”)

    By the way, many rabbis hold that you CAN shower with hot water on Yom Tov, since heating the water is not a problem unlike on Shabbat. Maybe they understand that in modern society, showering over a 3-day yom tov in hot weather IS a necessity.

  • Chosid April 21, 2009, 9:09 AM

    MO,

    If you’d like modern sources look in Shulchan Aruch HaRav or Mishna Breruah where the exceptions are clearly listed along with to what degree showering is permitted. If I remember correctly if you are really mitztaer (and not just uncomfortable) then it may be mutar according to some opinions to wash up 49% of your body in hot water that was even heated on yontif.

    Mark,

    You don’t know any better so I won’t judge you for it; however it’s important to know that your approach is one that is rejected by the Torah and historically embraced only by apikorsim.

  • Phil April 21, 2009, 9:30 AM

    Chosid,

    That leads us to the next question.
    If bathing is a necessity, is it better to have the maid give you a sponge bath?

  • Chosid April 21, 2009, 10:50 AM

    Phil,

    Do all questions need an answer? 🙂

    Mark,

    My response was unfair because I denied you a chance to learn a better approach. If you want to know what ratzon hayelyon is for you, there’s a very simple place to look. The poskim, certainly the most modern ones, are accessible to all. If a shaila is addressed in them then you don’t have a question, you just lack knowledge. If you can’t learn it yourself than you can ask someone that has. For that you don’t need a Rav.

    You need a Rav for that gray area where there isn’t a clear answer. For that you need siyata dishmaya. And he need not be a huge tzaddik either. This is where all his Torah knowledge comes in handy. The fact that he’s learned hilchos nidda, for example, will help him to answer your shaila about kashrus. Because by virtue of his learning, he is closer to Hashem. And that’s ultimately what you need when you ask a shaila. Although knowledge of the subject is obviously necessary as well.

  • Chosid April 21, 2009, 10:51 AM

    Phil,

    Do all questions need an answer? 🙂

    Mark,

    My response was unfair because I denied you a chance to learn a better approach. If you want to know what ratzon hayelyon is for you, there’s a very simple place to look. The poskim, certainly the most modern ones, are accessible to all. If a shaila is addressed in them then you don’t have a question, you just lack knowledge. If you can’t learn it yourself than you can ask someone that has. For that you don’t need a Rav.

  • Chosid April 21, 2009, 10:53 AM

    Phil,

    Do all questions need an answer? 🙂

    Mark,

    My response was unfair because I denied you a chance to learn a better approach. If you want to know what ratzon hayelyon is for you, there’s a very simple place to look. The poskim, certainly the most modern ones, are accessible to all. If a shaila is addressed in them then you don’t have a question, you just lack knowledge. If you can’t learn it yourself than you can ask someone that has. For that you don’t need a Rav.

  • Chosid April 21, 2009, 11:00 AM

    Phil,

    Do all questions need an answer? 🙂

    Mark,

    My response was unfair because I denied you a chance to learn a better approach. If you want to know what ratzon hayelyon is for you, there’s a very simple place to look. The poskim, certainly the most modern ones, are accessible to all. If a shaila is addressed in them then you don’t have a question, you just lack knowledge. If you can’t learn it yourself than you can ask someone that has. For that you don’t need a Rav.

    You need a Rav for that gray area that’s not addressed in the poskim. For that you need siyata dishmaya. And being a tzaddik isn’t necessary. This is where his knowledge of hilchos nidda, for example will help you in your kashrus question. Because by virtue of his learning he is closer to Hashem. And that’s ultimately what you’re looking for.

  • Mark April 21, 2009, 11:14 AM

    Chosid – You dont know any better so I wont judge you for it; however its important to know that your approach is one that is rejected by the Torah and historically embraced only by apikorsim.

    You won’t judge me, but you say I think like an apikores. Pretty funny. But that’s okay, I expect to be called an apikores by a Charedi, it’s what you believe. We’ll discuss it in Olam Habah and maybe we will see that we were both right.

  • Chosid April 21, 2009, 11:26 AM

    Phil,

    Do all questions need an answer? 🙂

    Mark,

    My response was a bit unfair because I denied you a chance to learn a better approach. If you want to know what ratzon hayelyon is for you, there’s a very simple place to look. The poskim, certainly the most modern ones, are accessible to all. If a shaila is addressed in them then you don’t have a question, you just lack knowledge. If you can’t learn it yourself than you can ask someone that has. For that you don’t need a Rav.

    You need a Rav for that gray area that’s not addressed in the poskim. For that you need siyata dishmaya. And being a tzaddik isn’t necessary. This is where his knowledge of hilchos nidda, for example will help you in your kashrus question. Because by virtue of his learning he is closer to Hashem. And that’s ultimately what you’re looking for.

  • Chosid April 21, 2009, 11:28 AM

    sorry the comments system has gone a little haywire with the duplicate comments.

  • SF2K1 April 21, 2009, 11:36 AM
  • fakewood April 21, 2009, 12:04 PM

    otd

    wow you are full of crap. i stumbled upon blogging a few months ago and decided i wanted to give it a shot so i named a blog otd. then he commented on my page witch only had one post, telling me about his blog. i then took it down right away. he is just pissed of at jews in general and is a virulent antisemite as can be seen on his blog. so any time i see him comment if find the need to bash him like i would any other antisemite.

  • Homey April 21, 2009, 1:30 PM

    Fakewood, almost all otd’s are like that, he’s no exception. Same goes for the self proclaimed “skeptics” who are just ignorant fools. Don’t waste your time on these people.

    And who says you can’t use hot water on Yom Tov??? Of course you can!

    There’s a concept in the Gemara called “Koach Dehetaira Odif”, which means the power to allow is better than the power to forbid, since any fool can forbid. It takes real brains (and guts these days) to allow. So to be on the safe side, most rabbonim will say, “Better not to”. That just means they have conflicting poskim on the matter, and they don’t know what to do themselves. It sickens me also.

  • Bsamim Smoker April 21, 2009, 1:31 PM

    To all you folks who need a real rabbi check out R’Weiss of HIR(Hebrew Institute of Riverdale)www.hir.org. He’s chilled, open minded and you can ask him about anything(and I mean ANYTHING) and he’ll always give you an objective non-biased answer, based on halachah, in a friendly warm tone of voice.

  • Chosid April 21, 2009, 4:31 PM

    Makes senese now where you’re coming from Besamim. The famous R Avi Weiss of recent female-“orthodox”-rabbi fame. Nu nu.

  • fakewood April 21, 2009, 7:38 PM

    homey

    i try not to make genarilzations to attack people i stick to their own faults.

  • Frum Satire April 21, 2009, 11:23 PM

    If you really want an answer I find it best to act as if you did the thing you are asking about and then the answer may be different

  • ghottistyx April 22, 2009, 1:52 AM

    Speaking as one who is OTD, I open the question to all who have taken to bashing us WHY? Yes, I question the actions of many frum people, but by no means do I hate them. Much of my family is frum. I love them all. Do you really think that the solution is the proverbial “hakeh et shinnav”?

    Not all OTDs are hateful. Yes, I admit, in the early stages there may have been a bit of vitriol against the Veldt I was escaping, but that was quickly gone. Yes, I get a lot of frum people raising their eyebrows at me (I don’t even look Jewish and I still can argue halakha with them). And yes, I’ve been asked a number of times if my parents say Kaddish for me (my answer, proudly, is “no”). But no, I respect frum people as long as they are respectful to me (and others).

    I admit that many fellow OTDs I’ve met are a lot angrier than I am. But there are also plenty who have put it past them and are more relaxed. Those who bash us so-called Amamei Ha’aretz: do you really think it’s conducive to bash us? Or would it be better to try to draw us back? Though I do strongly resist efforts to mekarayv me, I respond much more nicely to them than I do to efforts to stifle my ‘kefiruth’.

  • Sergeant J April 22, 2009, 2:14 AM

    I used to think I was OTD, but apparently,I am not..

  • Mark April 22, 2009, 6:16 AM

    If you really want an answer I find it best to act as if you did the thing you are asking about and then the answer may be different

    That’s a good idea, but I don’t like “lying” to people that I trust and that trust me.

  • Mark April 22, 2009, 6:20 AM

    Michal – My rabbi is usually not like this. I asked him what to do with music for Sefiras. He said that some dont listen, most others listen only to acapella and he does know of rabbis that permit any recorded music When you will be sitting on the subway for an hour and a half, you grow to depend on a CD so.

    This one is easy. I just listen to something else. I bring my iPod to the gym with me and often listen to music, but now I simply listen to something else, a business show, a recorded book, etc. And while I am on the elliptical, I almost always watch “Fast Money” on the iPod, it’s pretty interesting and has a quick pace. Just right for working out!

  • Bsamim Smoker April 22, 2009, 9:09 AM

    It’s so simple even a caveman could do it

  • Bsamim Smoker April 22, 2009, 9:14 AM

    Hesh I love this website and I think you do an awsome job.Just a little advice make sure the pics that you post are not copyrighted you don’t want to get your a** sued

  • Michal bas Avraham April 22, 2009, 5:04 PM

    Chosid,
    Actually, she’s not a rabbi, she teaches classes at the shul. They call her madruca or something like that. I have this reputation on here of being so far to the right, so this will surprise people. I don’t see the big deal. If a woman becomes knowledgeable and teaches classes, she has no title but it’s ok for her to teach classes. She can just marry a rabbi and she gets a title. However, should a woman not marry a rabbi, there’s no title no matter how knowledgeable she is, no matter if she’s teaching classes.

    Also, she teaches the conversion program up there. OZ used to have a woman teaching a class at the conversion program. However, she didn’t have a title.

    On the Fakewood/OTD/Ghostiks discussion…
    And you guys think I”m mean? At least my critcizisms are related to that post or that post’s comment string, not such a simple hatred of a fellow commenter.

  • offthederech April 22, 2009, 6:34 PM

    Fakewood:
    If you’re so frum, why the hell would you call your blog “otd”?

  • offthederech April 22, 2009, 6:35 PM

    Michal: >Speak truth and you will be hated.

    Right on.

  • Chosid April 22, 2009, 10:38 PM

    Michal,

    I’m afraid you’re mistaken. If you watch the interview of her that’s circulating the net, she says, in her own words, that she is a Rabbi in all but name. Of course there’s nothing wrong with her teaching. But she does much more than that. There’s something very wrong with messing with minhag yisroel when there’s not some sort of crisis threatening the whole Yiddishkeit.

  • Mark April 22, 2009, 11:16 PM

    Chosid – But she does much more than that.

    I only know what I read about it. But what exactly does she do that you think is improper? I think I read that she doesn’t do a lot of things that Rabbis do (mesader kiddushin, paskening, etc). What specifically do you think a Rabbi can do but she isn’t permitted to do?

  • ghottistyx April 22, 2009, 11:21 PM

    Funny you should mention that, Chosid, because last Pesach my frum Uncle said the exact same thing about them being treated as Rabbis in all but title. He then went on to joke about the JTS’ decision to ordain homosexuals by asking ‘who’s the rebitzen?’ (I didn’t dignify that one).

    The question I would ask is what the specific threat here is? Are we upset because she should be at home cooking, cleaning, and conceiving instead? Have we forgotten about Beruriah and Rashi’s daughters? I know we’re not going to pan Rashi as being a precursor to Rabbi Avi Weiss now (not that there’s anything wrong with that).

    And Michal, I’m with you as well. I prefer one who is “mean and honest” than one who (a) wears a sheepskin over closed-minded dogmatism, or (b) one who simply “flames” (to use common parlaince) based on personal vendetta.

  • Chosid April 23, 2009, 9:56 PM

    The specific threat is to what we value as frum yidden and how those values are reflected in our holy minhagim. Not for nothing that minhag yisroel torah he. A man has certain responsibilities and a woman has certain responsibilties – both very important but different. Obviously to some extent each can and should venture into the other’s sphere. But for a woman to be doing what has always been a man’s job goes against Torah. Not specifically halacha [as far as I know. obviously not referring to JTS and the ilk who are outright oiver] but rather the way of life we’ve inherited from sinai.

    As an aside, we shouldn’t forget that originally the conservatives also clasified themselves as a “halachic” movement and found justification for their actions from the gemara and poskim. But that is certainly not where it stayed. But I feel tha even aside from the likely slide in halacha adherence, this remains the wrong move.

    As far as I know, they follow halacha where a woman specifically cannot do certain things, like pasken and lein. But everywhere else, she basically acts as the Rav. Still wrong. And they freely acknowledge this.

  • ghottistyx April 24, 2009, 7:32 AM

    And did the Ba’al Shem Tov not get accused of the same thing back in his day? If you read what The Vilna Ga’on–and the other Litvish gedolim of the day–were saying about the first generation of Chassidim (pretty much before Menachem Mendel of Kotzk), they were slamming him for very blatantly flouting minhagay yisroel. Plenty of them even saw him as nothing more than another Shabbetai Tzvi or Jacob Frank (lehavdil).

    Whatever Hassidism became, if we are to look at the Ba’al Shem Tov, or even some of his immediate successors (Maggid of Mezeritch, Levi Yitzchok of Berditchev, et al), if we take their actions prima facae, then we have a nice case where minhagim simply were changed because the ones that were currently being practiced were turning people away.

    Where do we draw a line? Or do we have to assume that the Ba’al Shem Tov was a tzadik who had to reveal himself and thus is a different case altogether?

  • Chosid April 24, 2009, 12:34 PM

    The Baal Shem Tov was different because if not for chasidus and the revolutions it accompished throughout the entire yiddishkeit, chasidic or not, there would not be a yiddishkiet today.

  • Anonymous April 24, 2009, 4:30 PM

    Not everything in halachah which is mutar do we have to do. There is no mitzvah in putting yourslef on the line between mutar and assur just to show that what you are doing is technically ok.

    There is of course the famous Ramban in parshat Kedoshim that speaks of the “naval b’reshut haTorah.” The Torah tells us what is kosher to eat, but that doesn’t mean we have to be gluttons, stuffing kosher food down our throats all the time. There is a sense of a proper and modest way for a ben/bat Torah to act. This is usually the meaning for “it is not recommended.” Of course I cannot speak for every Rav, but this generally seems to be true, at least by my Rebbeim. In terms of assur and mutar, the halachah is either or for the most part. Even if something is a machloket you can hold of one opinion. But in terms of the way you act, it is not as clear cut. A person’s actions affect his Avodat Hashem and as such, it would be wise to consider (once you know something is mutar) whether it is ultimately beneficial or proper.

    Is it assur to wear a kippah with pictures of the seinfeld cast or kids show characters on it? No. Is it recommended? No, because if you consider the matter, you can easily see that it is not proper to put such a thing (which is an ancient halachah, meant to be a reminder of Hashem) on our heads. Can you honestly picture a Jew who walks through a city street with such a kippah is setting a good example or is promoting a good image of being a Jew to others who would notice such a thing? Furthermore, think of the detrimental effects it could have on the wearer, if this is what he wears to show his respect and fear of G-d!

    This example happens to be my opinion as well as that of many others. (and I’m not a yeshivisher with a black velvet yarmulke; I wear a srugi.) If anyone reading this has a problem with this kippah issue, bear in mind that there is no need to argue on this example, because agree or disagree the fundamental principle stands.

    There is such a thing as “it is not recommended” in Judaism.

  • Ariel April 24, 2009, 5:09 PM

    Never happened to me before. Tell your Rabbi that he should say if he doesn’t know, or just change your Rabbi, but be careful that you switch to the right Rabbi.

    Other times they tell you so because if they think it is too much on a person they do not want to much pressure on you.

    EnetBaron.com everyone

  • fakewood April 27, 2009, 3:20 PM

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